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France and Italy tighten rules

As of February 15, the French “sanitary passage” in practice requires a reinforcement. Anyone who has been vaccinated for more than four months before then must get an extra shot to be counted as vaccinated. “We have decided to change the rules, but to give everyone time to adapt. From February 15 it will be necessary to have a booster dose in four months, not seven,” said Health Minister Olivier Veran.

France: Shortening the validity of reinforcement

However, France is tightening the reins. For now, the vaccination is still valid indefinitely. This will change from January 15th; Then after seven months, a local green QR code booster is needed. This actually applies to people over 65, by the way. Again a month later that would be four months for everyone. The goal of the Government of France is to motivate as many people as possible to get a booster dose.

You need a passe sanitaire to enter restaurants, museums, and ski lifts, for example. In the same ski lifts, and this is also new, you must wear a face mask if you are over 6 years old. This rule is in effect from Monday and also applies when you walk into a restaurant or other crowded public places. In addition, you are only allowed to sit in bars and restaurants.

The tests are no longer valid for obtaining a health permit

The French government is tightening the policy further, so that the sewage card can no longer be tested. The plan was not passed through Parliament.

Italy: The test is no longer valid

Italy is also tightening the reins, now that the omicron variant has raised pollution figures. From January 10, 2G will be applied everywhere in Italy, which means that you must provide a certificate of vaccination up to 9 months or a certificate of recovery up to 6 months. With the test, you no longer enter restaurants and museums.

Austria has very strict rules to keep Dutch travelers away for now. We have been designated as an area with a dangerous viral variant, therefore, if you cross the border without a booster or a recent recovery certificate and a negative test, you should be quarantined. However, several travelers told De Telegraaf that they had not been screened and that hotel bosses let them in or referred them to a local doctor who could put in a booster potion. Others can simply get a ski pass without showing any evidence.

By the way, French and Italian rules are not about entry. In any case, from February 1, European rules for crossing the border will likely apply again. The requirement is that the person receives a booster dose nine months after the vaccination. Otherwise, expensive testing, or proof of post-infection recovery before 180 days, is often required.